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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)
committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: joan walsh is an editor at large for salon and the author of a new book, "what's the matter w/white people?: why we long for a golden age that never was." she joins us tonight from new york. >> thank you, tavis. good to be back. tavis: this title is provocative. "what's the matter with white people?" >> the title has three meanings, but we get stuck on one, thanks to mitt romney and paul ryan. why does it happen that 90% of identified republicans according to the gallup poll are white in a country that is now 62% non- hispanic white? looking at this house some moved away towards the democratic party, and what -- looking at how some moved away towards the democratic party. they were very good at taking some of the chaos of the 1960's, using it against the democrats, and convincing these middle- class people that government had been identified with the interests of minorities and the poor and was not w
they would have phone to president obama under the situation. president obama would not have gotten us in that fix in the first place but it is an interesting election. i really think that, you know, who knows, it is all turnout, it is the polls are goofy, i mean one day i will have a candidate be five points up and the next poll, eight points down, you are like, well how could this be, you know, well let's split the difference and call it an even race, but how can these polls be so all over the map, same thing as you said with the real estate, there is who way that the gender gap -- how could they be for romney? how could women be for romney? person hood? he doesn't know if he would sign lilly led better. >> .. paycheck fairness. binders. i mean, how could women vote for romney? >> rose: thank you for comi pleare toto see you. see you next time.i/w captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> rose: funding for charlie rose has been provided by the coca-cola company, supporting this program since 2002. and american express. a
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: if you think they are not any big ideas out there, salman khan is a man with a big idea. he founded the free nonprofit khan academy to provide free education to anyone, anywhere. he has delivered more than 45 million lessons today. salman khan, good to have you on this program today. when you say the one world schoolhouse, what do you mean by that? >> it was intentionally in chosen to be interpreted a couple of different ways. it is kind of a play on words, to harken back to the one-room schoolhouse where you have the students all helping each other, more time with the teacher. tavis: for those who are not yet familiar with your work, tell me how the khan academy works. >> it is most known for a collection of videos that i started making for my cousin. there are now over 3000 of them, everything from basic arithmetic all the way to college level calculus or biology or chemistry. a lot of students are using it as a supplement. if you are having troub
dollars to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp out color. -- we can stamp out hunger. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: phyllis bennis is the new director for the international ism project. she joined us tonight from new york. it is good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you, tavis. poopsie but in and ryan went -- tavis: biden and ryan went after it tonight. it was interesting for a lot of people to watch. but we get back to it really matters, the two guys at the top of the ticket, president obama and governor romney. given that governor romney came back out with his own policy speech, that policy will get on to the agenda in the next two debates in the last debate is exclusively about foreign policy. we know we are headed in that direction but the speech that mr. ravi gave earlier this week, he essentially suggested that president obama had been weak on foreign policy. he went on to deconstructs that and explain it in a variety of ways. but yourhoughts on mr. romney's approach to put foreig
you could join us for conversation with olympic star allyson felix, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: allyson felix is one of the most decorated female track stars in recent history. she had a standout performance at the london games. she set the world record on one of the marquee olympic events and is also an advocate on a number of important issues including childhood obesity. good to have you on this program. are you doing all right? >> i am good. tavis: let's do this right quick, bam. these things are heavy. i love this. these are very, very heavy. >> they are heavier than you would expect. tavis: i would be like this. [laughter] tavis: how did i
to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jeffrey sachs back to this program. he is one of the most important voices in our time. the director of the earth institute at columbia. his latest book is called "the price of civilization." he joins us tonight from new york. jeffrey sachs, good to have you back on this program. >> good to be back on. tavis: what has happened in this country since you wrote this book that made to put some new stuff in it for the paperback version? >> this book was about things really going wrong in america. the lack of civic virtue among the rich and powerful that we have expected and that we need. after i put the pen down in a writing the original book, the occupy movement brought attention finally around this country to huge inequalities. we have a campaign between a republican party that has a double down on greed and fear -- for the super-rich versus president obama of who is trying to steer a middle course. i like to see him ste
you could join us for my conversation with d.l. hughley, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome d.l. hughley back to this program. later this month, you can catch his all new comedy special, called "d.l. hughley: the endangered list." the one-hour special airs saturday, october 27 on -- at 11:00 on comedy central. here is a preview. >> one of the groups we have got to start with -- lobbyists. i want to tell you i i am here. this is a little bit insane, but it is the real thing. i am trying to get the black man put on the endangered species list. >> it sounds a little crazy. definitely not the craziest things we have worked on. we have wor
joined us. king had that said there is right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: fernando espuelas is the host of the show that bears his name. he is one of the 100 notable hispanics. thank you for being here. it predicts a record latino turnout this time around. >> it is clear with all this enthusiasm across the nation they really galvanized a lot of people. tavis: i assume he is going to get the lion's share of that vote. >> they are 75%, so mr. romney has the lowest support since its gerald ford. i think mr. romney made a strategic decision to go after the hispanic vote. the republican platform reflects that. tavis: how would you situate the issue of immigration reform? >> i think it is more of a proxy for how people feel they are being disrespected by the rest of the country, and they brought immigration to the fore, not so much that is the issue
, we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome andrew mccarthy to this program. he is now an award winning travel writer that serves as an editor at large for national geographic travel. the his critically acclaimed book is called "along the way home." nice to have you on this program. i assume that you must be tackled at the reception this book is receiving. >> it is also a huge relief because it is a complicated thing. it is a relief when it is received in a nice way so that it can stand and rise and fall on its own as opposed to some weird baggage it gets from being my history. tavis: yeah, yeah. were their doubts or trepidation about
." we're glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: sheila bair is the former chair of the fdic. her efforts to take on wall street excess and stand up for average americans is the subject of the new text "bull by the horns." to goodve you on this program. >> thank you for having me. tavis: let me start with the news of this week. everybody knows in 48 hours, for the first time, mitt romney and mr. obama will come face to face in a debate. if you were jim wednesday night, where these issues are concerned, at the economy, how we avoid what has happened already, how we avoid falling into another recession, around those issues, what ought to be debated wednesday night?
$2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ari berman is a political correspondent for "the nation" and author of the book "herding donkeys." last year he wrote a piece called "the gop war on voting." much of what he wrote has come to fruition. he joins us from new york. good to have you on this program. >> i am a longtime admirer. thanks for having me. tavis: honored to have you on. let me talk about this piece you wrote for "rolling stone." i don't want people to think we are demonizing or casting aspersions on the gop, but i want you to lay out the facts. is it the case that most of this push, these strict voter i.d. laws, this is being pushed almost exclusively by republicans, yes or no? >> there are issues where democrats and republicans are at fault, where they are both to blame. this is not one of these issues. this is an issue that since the 2010 elections, laws that restrict the right to vote have been passed overwhelmingly by republ
behind us, the next two weeks will be a sprint to the finish line in what is virtually a dead heat. election night could be a long night with a couple of key swing states out west possibly holding the key to the race. tonight, we will look at the impact of the west with adam nagourney, l.a. bureau chief for the new york times. his thoughts on a controversial anti-union proposition in california and we would discuss the passing of a liberal lion over the weekend, george mcgovern. a conversation with adam nagourney of the new york times coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: adam nagourney is the l.a. bureau chief for the new york times following years as
to a very small amount per week without forfeiting housing benefit which was the thing that was keeping us homed so i worked up to that amount, i had a clerical job in a church at one point, so i -- and then i was teaching, but we were still existing partly on benefits, i couldn't wholly support us and then the miracle happened. harry buzz published and we really didn't look back after a few months. it changed my life. that period, that period of my life was a formative experience for me and it shaped my world view and it always will shape my world view. the experience of having been part of a mass of people who are very voiceless, the experience of being scapegoated and stigmatized because that was a political crime at that time, really has colored my world view in a sense and i don't thinkly ever lose it. i don't think i will ever lose it. >> rose: funding for chedid tyhe coa-colac company, supportingpot this program since 2002. and american express. additional funding provided by these funders. ndd by bloomberg, a provider ofa multimediafo ns and information services worldwide. be more,
to the polls to determine the outcome of one of the most closely watched presidential campaigns in u.s. history. in a look at the state of the race and a preview of tuesday night's second presidential debate with the national affairs editor for new york magazine and co-author of the best selling text "game change." we are glad you have joined us. a conversation coming out right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: job as the national affairs editor for new york magazine and a political analyst for msn bc. he wrote the best-selling book "game change. his election issue of new york magazine is on newsstands and he joins us tonight from new york. thank you for coming back. >> i am happy to
us with dr. peter ubel. right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment. health happens in neighborhoods. learn more. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. peter ubel is a widely respected scientist and physicians at duke university. his latest text is called "critical decisions." doctor, good to have you on this program. >> good to be here. tavis: i should have put a darker blue tie on. my apologies to you and all of the good folks at duke. it seems to me that so often when doctors and patients get together, what they are talking about, doctor, are life and death decisions. tell me how honesty, how transparency, how open this enters the room in a setting like that -- how open this -- op
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)

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